The Many Faces of Pluto

Explanation: Four faces of Pluto in black-and-white and color. From left to right, the central sub-observer longitudes are ~180, 240, 360 and 60 degrees East Longitude. The Pluto "Encounter Hemisphere" (indicated by the white box) is most recognizable by the "heart" feature of the informally-named Tombaugh Regio. This is also the hemisphere that today never faces Charon, as Charon is "tidally locked" to Pluto, similarly to how the Earth only sees one face of our moon. Pluto's "Charon-facing" side is the second column from the right. Pluto's north pole is up in all these images. The top row contains LORRI grey-scale images taken on July 13, July 12, June 27 and July 3rd, when Pluto was 620, 189, 24 and 36 LORRI pixels across, respectively. The bottom row shows MVIC "enhanced-color" images made by combining the near infrared, red and blue filters. They were taken on July 13, July 12, July 10 and July 9, when Pluto was 163, 56, 26 and 21 MVIC color pixels across, respectively. All these images surpass what we had previously seen from Hubble Space Telescope imagery where Pluto's disk was only about 12 pixels across. Of course, New Horizons was only millions of miles from Pluto — Hubble is over 3 billion miles away!

Pluto

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI